Reviews and in the News

Review: Mother Nature permitting, latest Odyssey offering is limber night of theatre, by Peter Robb of Artsfile

“In all this and what follows, Craig employs humour to wonderful effect. An eco-play could be ponderous, but there’s not a whiff of that here. Instead, just as the play edges toward finger-wagging, Craig throws in a joke, easing rather than shoving us toward his point of view.”

Review: Lysistrata in the New World, by Alvina Ruprecht of Capital Critics Circle

“Lysistrata and the Temple of Gaia  or Apocalyptus Interruptus is a treat not to be missed.”

“One revelation after the other drives the plot forward, each one plays out with more wit and textual charm  with underlying depth than the preceding , creating  a delightful text full of fascinating exchanges.   In fact, Craig’s script follows the logic of its Greek predecessor in a most astute way, giving us the feeling that everything that unfolds here in the 21st century follows in the footsteps of Aristophanes.”

Theatre Review: Lysistrata and the Temple of Gaia—until 08.26.18 at Strathcona Park, by Phil Caunter of Apt613

“There is a lot to enjoy in the character and humanity written into these characters and this story. Lysistrata (Shelley Simester) and her husband Cleon (Martin Julien) shine brightest, carrying the show emotionally with feistiness and tender depth in hand.”

“Credit to Craig and his superb cast for finding the humanity within all the oldest tropes in the book.”

Other Coverage

A Greek classic about a sex strike, recast and reconsidered in the age of #metoo, by Lynn Saxberg of The Ottawa Citizen

Could a sex strike and an ancient Greek play halt the impending ravages of climate change?

“Toronto-based playwright David S. Craig figured there was an outside chance of exactly that, so he wrote Lysistrata and the Temple of Gaia. Inspired by Aristophanes’ Lysistrata, Craig’s new play is billed as the world’s first eco-sex comedy.”

Odyssey Theatre presents a gift of Greek theatre, by Patrick Langston of Artsfile

Could a sex strike and an ancient Greek play halt the impending ravages of climate change?

“Toronto-based playwright David S. Craig figured there was an outside chance of exactly that, so he wrote Lysistrata and the Temple of Gaia. Inspired by Aristophanes’ Lysistrata, Craig’s new play is billed as the world’s first eco-sex comedy.” 

Biking to Strathcona Park, by Ottawa Velo Outaouais

“With the 2015 opening of the Adawe Bridge over the Rideau River, Strathcona Park became much more accessible to cyclists from points east. This route explores how to get there from the west, starting in Centretown.  The purple line is an alternative deviation on the return trip to avoid having to ride amongst traffic on Laurier, as the west bound segregated bike lane only starts at Elgin. If anyone needs a different bike route to get to Strathcona Park let me know & I’ll figure it out.”